Back in April of this year, AMD announced its new series of Ryzen 5000G processors with integrated graphics. These processors were an upgrade over the previous generation of 4000G hardware by using AMD’s newest Zen 3 cores coupled with Vega 8 integrated graphics. At the time those processors were released for the pre-built system market only, with promises that retail versions would be made available later in the year. Today AMD is announcing two Ryzen 5000G models for retail, coming to market worldwide on August 5th.

Ryzen 5000 Gets a G

AMD runs two lines of processors: those without integrated graphics, which are often targeted for higher performance markets with a chiplet design, and those with integrated graphics which use higher powered versions of the equivalent mobile monolithic silicon. Normally we differentiate between the two by calling the first a CPU and the second an APU, and AMD gives the latter easily identifiable product names because they all end in a G, for graphics.

AMD has launched several generations of APUs built upon its Ryzen architecture:

  • Ryzen 2000G (Raven Ridge), built on 14nm Zen with Vega 11
  • Ryzen 3000G (Picasso), built on 12nm Zen+ with Vega 11
  • Ryzen 4000G (Renoir), built on 7nm Zen 2 with Vega 8
  • Ryzen 5000G (Cezanne), built on 7nm Zen 3 with Vega 8

The names in brackets are the official codenames for each of the processors. Because these APUs use the same silicon as the equivalent mobile processors, these desktop parts have the same codename as the mobile variants.

Both the 2000G and 3000G families were offered at retail, and the 3400G/2400G have both been popular processors. By contrast, we never saw a formal retail launch of Ryzen 4000G. This product line was focused for the pre-built market, especially for business ‘PRO’ use – AMD even stated at launch that these would likely never be offered for retail. The only way to get them has been to wait for hardware to filter through the resale market or hope that some pre-built vendors ordered too many and are selling them direct to end users. We ended up obtaining three of the APUs in this market, and put them to the test.

Testing The World’s Best APUs: Desktop AMD Ryzen 4750G, 4650G and 4350G

When the Ryzen 5000G family was first formally announced, AMD was again leading with the pre-built market. What made that launch different was that AMD also committed at the time to bringing the processor line to retail, so end-users could buy them on shelves in official retail packaging with a full warranty.

Out of the six processors that were initially launched, two of them are coming to retail on August 5th. AMD claims a worldwide launch.

AMD Ryzen 5000G Series APUs
AnandTech Core /
Thread
Base
Freq
Turbo
Freq
GPU
CUs
GPU
Freq
PCIe
*
TDP
Ryzen 5000G
Ryzen 7 5700G 8 / 16 3800 4600 8 2000 16+4+4 65 W
Ryzen 7 5700GE 8 / 16 3200 4600 8 2000 16+4+4 35 W
Ryzen 5 5600G 6 / 12 3900 4400 7 1900 16+4+4 65 W
Ryzen 5 5600GE 6 / 12 3400 4400 7 1900 16+4+4 35 W
Ryzen 3 5300G 4 / 8 4000 4200 6 1700 16+4+4 65 W
Ryzen 3 5300GE 4 / 8 3600 4200 6 1700 16+4+4 35 W
*PCIe lanes on the SoC are listed in GFX+Chipset+Storage

Both of the launched processors come from AMD’s 65 W TDP line, so unfortunately we won’t have retail versions of the 35 W models right now. Both processors also have 24 lanes of PCIe 3.0 and will support DDR4-3200. These processors will be supported in 500-series motherboards with appropriate BIOS updates for full performance - 400-series support will depend on the manufacturer.

The top processor coming to retail is the Ryzen 7 5700G, with eight cores and sixteen threads, with a suggested retail price of $359. This processor has a base frequency of 3.8 GHz, a single core turbo frequency of 4.6 GHz, and will enable the full Vega 8 graphics at 2000 MHz.

The other processor is the Ryzen 5 5600G, with six cores and twelve threads, and a suggested retail price of $259. At a base frequency of 3.9 GHz and a single core frequency of 4.4 GHz, this processor will enable 7 compute units in the Vega integrated graphics at 1900 MHz.

Being based on the mobile cores means that these processors will have only 16 MB of L3 cache, which is half of the CPU variants without integrated graphics. Ironically enough usually a larger L3 cache helps integrated graphics, but as we are using the same silicon for mobile processors and APUs, some tradeoffs are made, mostly for the mobile side which is the bigger market for this silicon.

Comparing to Desktop CPUs

We've been asked to showcase the difference between the CPUs and APUs.

AMD Ryzen 5600 Variants
AnandTech Core /
Thread
Base
Freq
Turbo
Freq
GPU
CUs
GPU
Freq
PCIe
 
L3
MB
TDP SEP
Ryzen 5 5600X 6 / 12 3700 4600 - - 4.0 x24 32 65 W $299
Ryzen 5 5600G 6 / 12 3900 4400 7 1900 3.0 x24 16 65 W $259

If we put side by side the Ryzen 5 5600X, the CPU, with Ryzen 5 5600G, we see a lot of similarities. Both have six cores and 12 threads, both run at 65 W, and both have 24 PCIe lanes.

However, there are a number of differences as well. The 5600X CPU has an extra +200 MHz on the turbo frequency, whereas the 5600G APU has +200 on the base frequency and it also has integrated graphics. On top of this, the CPU has PCIe 4.0 rather than PCIe 3.0, and the CPU has double the cache.

The price difference puts the 5600X as more expensive by $40, but likely still the processor of choice for anyone wanting a fast discrete graphics card system.

If we go up to the 8-core parts, then that disparity changes a little. 

AMD Ryzen 7 5000 Variants
AnandTech Core /
Thread
Base
Freq
Turbo
Freq
GPU
CUs
GPU
Freq
PCIe
 
L3
MB
TDP SEP
Ryzen 7 5800X 8 / 16 3800 4700 - - 4.0 x24 32 105 W $449
Ryzen 7 5700G 8 / 16 3800 4600 8 2000 3.0 x24 16 65 W $359

For this comparison, there is no base frequency difference, but the turbo is higher on the 5800X. The APU still has the integrated graphics, but is only PCIe 3.0 off the processor and not PCIe 4.0 like the CPU. We still have the cache difference.

So the question is which would you rather have - 100-200 MHz extra CPU frequency, double the L3 cache, and PCIe 4.0, or would you rather have integrated graphics? At a price differential of $90, now it suddenly got interesting.

Ryzen Pro 5000G and Full Ryzen 5000-Series Desktop Processor List

Alongside the two new Ryzen 5000G processors coming to retail, AMD is also announcing today a few additions to the Ryzen Pro stack at both the 65W and 35W power points. These are easily identifyable by the '50G' at the end of the name, and the 65 W models are identical to the non-Pro counterparts.

Adding in the pricing to our full processor list gives the following:

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Processors for Desktop
Zen 3 Microarchitecture
AnandTech Core/
Thread
Base
Freq
1T
Freq
L3
C$
IGP PCIe TDP SEP
Ryzen 9 5950X 16 32 3400 4900 64 MB - 4.0 105 W $799
Ryzen 9 5900X 12 24 3700 4800 64 MB - 4.0 105 W $549
Ryzen 9 5900 12 24 3000 4700 64 MB - 4.0 65 W OEM
Ryzen 7 5800X 8 16 3800 4700 32 MB - 4.0 105 W $449
Ryzen 7 5800 8 16 3400 4600 32 MB - 4.0 65 W OEM
Ryzen 7 5700G 8 16 3800 4600 16 MB Vega8 3.0 65 W $359
Ryzen 7 5700GE 8 16 3200 4600 16 MB Vega8 3.0 35 W OEM
Ryzen 5 5600X 6 12 3700 4600 32 MB - 4.0 65 W $299
Ryzen 5 5600G 6 12 3900 4400 16 MB Vega7 3.0 65 W $259
Ryzen 5 5600GE 6 12 3400 4400 16 MB Vega7 3.0 35 W OEM
Ryzen 3 5300G 4 8 4000 4200 8 MB Vega6 3.0 65 W OEM
Ryzen 3 5300GE 4 8 3600 4200 8 MB Vega6 3.0 35 W OEM
Ryzen 5000 Pro
Ryzen 7 Pro 5750G 8 16 3800 4600 16 MB Vega8 3.0 65 W OEM
Ryzen 7 Pro 5750GE 8 16 3200 4600 16 MB Vega8 3.0 35 W OEM
Ryzen 5 Pro 5650G 6 12 3900 4400 16 MB Vega7 3.0 65 W OEM
Ryzen 5 Pro 5650GE 6 12 3400 4400 16 MB Vega7 3.0 35 W OEM

AMD has not commented about any other OEM-only processors coming to retail at this time.

Retailed Reading

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  • lmcd - Tuesday, June 1, 2021 - link

    A bit shocked, since these are surely the same die as AMD's hard-to-keep-stocked high-end mobile. I guess the higher-wattage bins could have a decent number of leftover dies. Reply
  • Alistair - Tuesday, June 1, 2021 - link

    Where I am (Canada) even with a massive sale you are paying $475 USD for the 5800X. The 5700G at $359 would be HUGE (unless we also pay $450 USD in Canada for it, ugh). $115 off and you get integrated graphics. The only sad thing is I can't have it now, having to until August is a bummer. When does Alder Lake launch? Reply
  • ET - Tuesday, June 1, 2021 - link

    Alder Lake is expected to launch in November. But that's not official, and Intel does have the tendency to postpone releases. Reply
  • AntonErtl - Tuesday, June 1, 2021 - link

    Good to hear that these APUs are going to be released in retail.

    I wonder about the recommended price (what does SEP stand for, BTW?) Apparently AMD sees a negative value in adding a GPU; admittedly, these APUs have only half the L3 cache (probably quite relevant among gamers), PCIe3 instead of 4, a small disadvantage in boost clock, and the price is 9 months or so later, but I still find it strange. Maybe AMD will lower the SEP of the CPUs at the same time.

    As long as AMD's marketing does not see a significant value in the GPU, I fear we will not see an APU with a big Infinity cache (to make up for the limited RAM bandwidth) in an APU.
    Reply
  • nandnandnand - Tuesday, June 1, 2021 - link

    Suggested eTailer Price. No, not a typo.

    "AMD sees a negative value in adding a GPU" is a bad analysis. The 5700G has less performance and less features like you listed. You will also see that 5800X price coming down soon. Micro Center has been selling it a $400, Newegg/Amazon have had it for around $430.

    Your dream APU is a tough sell right now but it will come eventually. Of course, a big honking APU that far outclasses the 5700G already exists in the PS5 and Xbox Series X|S.
    Reply
  • mode_13h - Tuesday, June 1, 2021 - link

    > Of course, a big honking APU that far outclasses the 5700G
    > already exists in the PS5 and Xbox Series X|S.

    AMD can use infinity cache to surpass Vega8, for sure. But it's still going to come in below their dGPU range, because Infinity cache is only a partial solution. The bandwidth that consoles have is so far beyond what an APU can touch, not to mention their TDP is at the outer limits for a CPU.
    Reply
  • mode_13h - Tuesday, June 1, 2021 - link

    > which would you rather have - 100-200 MHz extra CPU frequency,
    > double the L3 cache, and PCIe 4.0, or would you rather have integrated graphics?

    This ignores the 40 W higher TDP, which translates to more boosting, more of the time.
    Reply
  • mode_13h - Tuesday, June 1, 2021 - link

    > AMD is also announcing today a few additions to the Ryzen Pro stack
    > ... the 65 W models are identical to the non-Pro counterparts.

    Except no ECC capability! If you want ECC in a DIY machine, AMD makes you buy their chiplet-based processors and then rely on the motherboard vendor for validation and support.

    This is the worst part about their "Pro" market segmentation. Why can't they either enable ECC in non-Pro APUs or just sell us the Pro versions even in OEM packaging and at a markup? Is that *really* a sticking point for OEMs? Or is AMD just being lazy?
    Reply
  • Kakti - Tuesday, June 1, 2021 - link

    I'm pretty disappointed to be honest. I just want a semi-usable iGPU in the event I'm troubleshooting my computer and need to remove the graphics card to confirm that's not the issue.

    My recent Ryzen 5800x build was the first pure CPU build in like 15+ years. I don't expect the iGPU to set the world on fire performance wise but it's a nice thing to have in an emergency or when troubleshooting a machine. This was by FAR the biggest "Con" I had against going for an AMD build this past winter, as I thought back to the dozens, possibly hundreds of times I've removed a GPU while isolating a problem on a computer I'm building/fixing for myself, family, friends, etc. But I bit the bullet and it's been smooth sailing so far *knocks on wood*.

    I was hoping that AMD would release a 5800x with an iGPU but it's clear they're sticking with the mobile CPU with a SoC that's severely limited in 1) PCIe version, running 3.0 2) PCIe lanes, with AFAIK zero coming from the SoC's chipset, as well as less L3, less TDP/Boost, etc.

    Is it not possible to take the laptop CPU and let it connect to the chipset in an x570 mobo to get extra lanes (obviously not here, but in general)? I'm confused why AMD is offering retail "desktop" CPU's that must be used with a laptop's SoC chipset, other than it's just cheaper and easier for AMD to take a pallet full of laptop SoC's and put them in individual boxes. Surely they can have the infinity fabric link that would connect to the rest of the SoC instead connect to a normal motherboard?
    Reply
  • mode_13h - Tuesday, June 1, 2021 - link

    > I just want a semi-usable iGPU in the event I'm troubleshooting my computer
    > and need to remove the graphics card to confirm that's not the issue.

    Why not just get a super-cheap GPU that you can swap in, for such purposes? I had a HD 5450 for that, which I replaced with a RX 550, a couple years ago. Anything <= 75 W is probably a good option.
    Reply

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