The ASUS P8P67 Pro fits near the beginning of the line-up in the ASUS launch, which in terms of ATX sized boards include the P8P67, the P8P67 Pro, the P8P67 Evo, the P8P67 Deluxe, the Sabertooth P67, the P8P67 WS SuperComputer and the top end Maximus IV Extreme. Therefore, with that in mind, we would expect to be looking at something above the base – slightly more (or better) features than the cheap boards available, enough to warrant the price difference. An overview of the P8P67 series is below:

P8P67 Series
P8P67 LE P8P67 P8P67 PRO P8P67 EVO P8P67 Deluxe
Price $140 $160 $190 $210 $235
SATA 6 Gb/s
SATA 3 Gb/s
eSATA
3
4
1
4
4
1 (bracket)
4
4
2
4
4
2
4
4
2
CrossFireX
SLI
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
USB 3.0
USB 2.0
2
14
4 (2 via header)
12
LAN 1 1 1 2 2
Bluetooth No Yes Yes Yes Yes

Visual Inspection

ASUS have gone with the blue/white/black livery for the Pro board, with a 12+2 digital VRM design covered by slanted blue heat sinks. The socket itself is relatively clear, easily allowing large 1155/1156 CPU coolers to be fitted (remember, 1155 mounting holes are the same as 1156). The CPU fan header is located at roughly one o’clock from the socket itself, with a chassis header to the right of the DIMM slots, presumably for HDD bay type fans.

Next to this header are the EPU switch and the MemOK buttons. The EPU switch enables Energy Processing Unit, which is geared towards saving energy – this encompasses power gating certain features that are never used/used rarely, and declocking when less compute is required. The MemOK button is a physical override for overclocked memory – by holding it down until the red light comes on, at next boot, the UEFI will override the memory settings to something more suitable.

The SATA connectors come in blue (SATA 3 Gb/s), white/grey (SATA 6 Gb/s provided by the chipset) and navy blue (SATA 6 Gb/s provided by a Marvell controller). There is a USB 3.0 header also here, near the DIMM slots. These are all next to the ASUS logo and chipset cooler, which underneath have another chassis header and a green power light. This board is lacking both a debug LED and power/reset buttons on the main board, much to our disappointment.

The PCI slots are well laid out, with a PCIe 1x at the top and enough space between the first two PCIe x16 for a PCI card, meaning that at least one is available if all three PCIe x16 are occupied with dual slot cards. The black PCIe x16 slot is wired up as an x4 slot (as it shares bandwidth with the x1 slots, two USB 3.0 ports and the eSATA ports), and with a dual slot card in there, will cover most of the board USB headers.

The TPU switch is underneath the PCI slots, and performs the same function as the TurboV EVO software in the OS to optimise the system for a decent and stable overclock.

The back panel is standard, with dual PS/2 connectors, SPDIF outputs, USB 2.0 slots, USB 3.0 slots, Firewire, eSATA, audio and Ethernet. The blue module three from the left is the ASUS Bluetooth module, designed to communicate with Bluetooth devices to enhance overclocking or utilise music management. The gigabit Ethernet is handily powered by an Intel chip.

Why $190? ASUS P8P67 Pro: Board Features, In the Box, Software
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  • publiorama - Sunday, January 23, 2011 - link

    I have a serious question about these mobos.

    Both Asus and Gigabyte P67 motherboards don't have "VT-D enable" option in their BIOS, whereas P55 does. Asrock P67 have it.
    So up to now, VT-D are non usable on Asus and Gb.
    What the hell is this ?? You got a CPU with VT-D and you cannot use it ??

    Have you some info about this ??
    That is a huge problem for many people.
    Reply
  • Cashano - Sunday, January 23, 2011 - link

    You need a non-K CPU (ii5-2400, i5-2500, i7-2600), so this wont be used for any OC-PC builder.

    Cashano
    Reply
  • publiorama - Sunday, January 23, 2011 - link

    It's sure you need a non-K CPU.
    I'm talking about motherboards.

    In Asus and Gb mobos there's NO VT-D option at all. In asrock P67 there is, and even the old asus P55 have that option.

    I'am asking if someone knows if VT-D support in Asus and Gb will be in some BIOS update, or watherver else.
    Reply
  • akula2 - Friday, February 4, 2011 - link

    I'm not sure about P67 Vt-d from Gigabyte or Asus, yet. But P55 offers the Vt-d support.
    Next, if you are looking for P67 with Vt-d, then get Intel's Extreme Series board, DP67BG (but wait till April, till Intel replaces its stock):

    http://www.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/...

    That MOBO fares very well, check out some reviews. But if you are OC freak, especially compare everything with Gigabyte/Asus then forget it.

    As of today, I've suspended procuring P67 MOBOs because of SATA bug plus Vt-d wasn't clear enough. I've to wait till April or so.
    Reply
  • radium69 - Sunday, January 23, 2011 - link

    I remember when I used to buy my Abit IP35 PRO "Off limits" it cost me $150 . It had nearly EVERYTHING, and it was a great motherboard. It's still going rocksolid with a modest overclock for over 3 years?

    I have build a lot of PCs, which housed a GIGABYTE DS3L motherboard, damn great motherboard, great features. And the price? $110. Overclockability? Just simply awesome. Running some older core 2 duo's with a modest overclock of 400/500mhz.

    BSOD's? NONE all in 2-3 years so far.
    It was THE bang for the budget motherboard for normal users. Offcourse we are all enthousiasts, but that doesn't mean we have enthousiast wallets...

    And for $190, it SHOULD come with just about everything AND have high quality parts.
    It's just that simple. I'lll be waiting for the sub $150 in depth reviews. That's where the majority is at. And so should you (anandtech) too.
    Reply
  • knirfie - Tuesday, January 25, 2011 - link

    Too bad LAN performance wasn't compared, this is often ignored because nearly all boards use Realtek cr*p.

    However, the Asus board uses an Intel solution, it would be interesting to see how badly the Intel chip beats the RTL8111 in terms of CPU load, throughput, etc.
    Reply
  • spikexp - Tuesday, January 25, 2011 - link

    So if I can get a p8p67 pro + 2500k for the same price (exact same) of a
    ASRock P67 Extreme4 + 2500k.
    The p8p67 pro would be better?
    Reply
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