Application and Futuremark Performance

Testing the CompuLab Intense PC is almost an academic exercise; mostly we want to make sure the Intel Core i7-3517UE is performing up to snuff and not being thermally throttled. I've hopped a lot of my desktop benchmarks over to the new mobile suite to keep everything lined up, so there isn't a tremendous amount of comparative data here. Still, you should get a pretty good idea of how the Intense PC stacks up against similar low-noise or no-noise boxes.

Futuremark PCMark 7

3D Rendering - CINEBENCH R11.5

Unfortunately these are currently the only comparative results I can offer, but they paint a fairly clear picture. Any system running an SSD is going to perform better in PCMark 7, that's a given, and both Puget Systems boxes are operating off of SSDs. The Lenovo ThinkCentre M92 Tiny is a different beast, offering superior CPU performance with its low-wattage quad-core processor.

  Intense PC Dell XPS 12 (i7-3517U)
3DMark (Ice Storm) 24472 32841
3DMark (Cloud Gate) 2997 3721
x264 HD 5.x Pass 1 21.69 29.83
x264 HD 5.x Pass 2 4.19 5.51

Above are the remaining benchmark results compared against Dell's XPS 12 ultrabook featuring the non-embedded Intel Core i7-3517U. It doesn't look good. While actual core temperatures for the Intense PC are pretty good, I suspect the embedded CPU is throttling more, and/or the BIOS for the Intense PC is keeping the chip from hitting higher thermals. Since the chassis is one big heatsink, the CPU would need to be kept under a certain temperature to avoid actually burning anyone who chooses to use the system. Performance isn't bad, but we're clearly looking at about 20% of the i7-3517U's potential left on the table.

Update: The embedded i7-3517UE actually has a nominal clock of 200MHz less than the standard i7-3517U, so the Intense PC's performance is actually pretty close to where it should be.

Introducing the CompuLab Intense PC User Experience, Power Consumption, and Heat
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  • A5 - Saturday, April 20, 2013 - link

    The Mac Mini will destroy itself if the fan fails or clogs. Like the article repeatedly says, you already know if this kind of thing is what you need. Reply
  • Greg512 - Saturday, April 20, 2013 - link

    I am not sure if you are trolling or not, but this pc does not have fans, unlike the Mac. You wouldn't buy this unless you had a specific usage case in mind that required a fan-less computer. Reply
  • ViewRoyal - Sunday, April 21, 2013 - link

    In answer to A5 and Greg512:

    No, I am not trolling... unless making a logical comparison is "trolling" to you. Yes the Mac mini does have a fan, but it rarely turns on since the solid aluminum enclosure acts as an excellent heat sync.

    The only time I've noticed the fan of a Mac mini turning on, was if the computer was in an excessively hot environment (for example in the hot sun by a window) or if the vents are covered. When the fan does come on, it is incredibly silent... and I've never heard of the Mac mini fan "clogging".

    There is a benefit to having a similarly small computer with a backup fan, which only turns on when conditions require it. The CompuLab Intense PC is hindered by relying entirely on its case design, and not having a fan to kick in when external conditions are too hot.
    Reply
  • kyuu - Sunday, April 21, 2013 - link

    You obviously don't understand the intended application of this device (despite the article repeatedly stating it). This is for industrial applications, not your house.

    Please, do go ahead and put a Mac Mini in an industrial environment and let us know how that goes.
    Reply
  • seanleeforever - Monday, April 22, 2013 - link

    yes you are trolling. unintentionally at the very least.

    this product, again, is not for home use. i assume you never use your computer other than home/office environment so i am not going to say harsh things to this comment.

    let's assume, if you want to have a log server on a air plane. your example of mac min will fail in no time. 1st. hot sun by a window is by no means a HOT temperature... anything industrial grade needs to go from -40 to 85. 2nd. environmentally sealed is a big thing. the fact that this guy is essentially in a seal box could potentially provide MIL spec 810, which is extremely desirable in a lot of places.
    Reply
  • andymcca - Saturday, April 20, 2013 - link

    ? Most mfr environments are on concrete slab w rubber padding under each station/unit. What use case are you referring to which involves outside of 2.5" disk tolerances (most of which are designed for laptop use)? Reply
  • andymcca - Saturday, April 20, 2013 - link

    ? Most mfr environments are on concrete slab w rubber padding under each station/unit. What use case are you referring to which involves outside of 2.5" disk tolerances (most of which are designed for laptop use)? Reply
  • andymcca - Saturday, April 20, 2013 - link

    appears anandtech can't handle replies w/o insecure browsing features (java).... Reply
  • NCAM - Sunday, April 21, 2013 - link

    Anandtech does not require Java.

    (Sent from my Java-free iPad.)
    Reply
  • kyuu - Sunday, April 21, 2013 - link

    He probably means Javascript, not Java. I'm guessing his troubles are from using Scriptblocker, as I had the same issue until I figured out which scripts to enable. Reply

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